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A Comparison of Premium Hand Grinders for Coffee and Espresso

A Comparison of Premium Hand Grinders for Coffee and Espresso

Dec 18th 2020 Written by Ryan Felbinger & Steve Morrow

Prices here reflect current listings as of October 2020.

The ascension of the grinder to its status as the most crucial piece of brewing gear is well deserved. More than anything else the grinder has the potential to make, or severely limit, the flavor quality of brewed coffee. It is natural, then, for this movement to extend across new territory—the world of mobile brewing. The hand grinder, once considered a compromise for convenience sake, has been reinvented to contend with some of the best electric home grinders on the market. Whether you’re sitting around a campfire, summiting a mountain, riding economy class, recharging in the office break room, or trying to keep it quiet in the kitchen at 6:00 AM, hand grinders have made it possible to brew excellent coffee anywhere.

Over the last few years, several premium hand grinders have been introduced to the market. These grinders share a few defining characteristics, including precision-cut steel burrs, a secure center shaft riding on dual (or more!) bearings, and an overall build quality that promises durability and a long lifetime. These features are considered standard for a quality hand grinder and, in essence, are all that’s needed for a uniform grind. That being said, the rather straight-forward requirements can make it somewhat difficult to determine which grinders stand in front of the rest.

But there’s good news—we’ve done the work for you. We've sourced several of the most popular premium hand grinders on the market and put them to the test, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each. Features are what truly distinguish these grinders from one another and this blog is intended to help you find the grinder with features most relevant to your needs.

Timemore Chestnut C2 — $86

Relatively new on the scene, Timemore has already made quite an impression with an assortment of stylish manual grinders, a scale, and even a suitcase for taking all the necessary coffee tools on the go. The C2 is Timemore's entry level grinder, but it deserves that label only because of its materials, some of which are plastic, not because of its grind quality, which is well above average.

C2 white w white background
C2 grinder open detail

Fit and Finish

Most of Timemore's manual grinders have an aluminum unibody frame, which includes the supports inside. The C2 is the anomaly, though, in that its interior supports are PCTG plastic, not metal. The grind adjustment wheel, lid, interior of the grinds-catch, and pommel are plastic, too, all factors in this grinder's relatively low price tag. That said, the important components, such as the metal body, 38mm conical steel burrs (cut for brewing, not espresso), and dual bearings, are the same as those found on the other Timemore models, so you can expect the same premium grind quality.

Grind Adjustment

All the Timemore grinders on this list have a stepped adjustment wheel not unlike the one found on the Comandante. Turning the dial clockwise pushes the center burr closer to the outer burr, fining the grind; turning the dial counterclockwise does the opposite, coarsening the grind. There are 12 steps per revolution, all etched into the dial for reference, so you can find and recall your preferred grind sizes. The manual includes fairly accurate recommendations for grind settings: 6-12 clicks from zero for fine, 15-24 for pour over, and 24 and up for coarse methods.

Highlights:
  • Most affordable grinder on this list.
  • Similar grind quality to the other Timemore models.
  • Available in two colors.
Drawbacks:
  • Many plastic components, including the interior supports.
  • Burrs cannot grind fine enough for espresso.
  • The plastic lid is thin and fragile.

Timemore NANO — $139-159

Timemore’s contender for best travel grinder, the NANO is the shortest grinder on this list and very nearly the lightest, a distinction it loses to the Fixie by a mere 30 grams. No wonder Timemore built an entire travel package around this compact grinder.

NANO with arm collapsed
NANO on side and open

Fit and Finish

The NANO and its bigger brother, the Slim, have a unique diamond pattern cut into its aluminum facade, a design choice that is not just for looks; it’s also for grip. Where it differs from the Slim, perhaps obviously, is in its size and spring-assisted crank arm. The NANO stands just 125 millimeters tall and 3 inches in diameter when the arm is folded against the body and the magnetic black walnut pommel is removed and slid inside the threaded grinds-catch. As a result of its squat frame, the hopper can fit only about 15 grams of coffee. On the inside are a stainless drive train with dual bearings and 38mm burrs of your choice—stainless steel for brewing or titanium-coated stainless steel for espresso, moka pot, and other methods necessitating a fine grind.

Grind Adjustment

The NANO can be fitted with titanium-coated stainless steel burrs for espresso grinding. However, the adjustment wheel is stepped, so it is difficult to dial in for espresso without up- or down-dosing to compensate for the lack of micro-adjustments. Turning the dial clockwise pushes the center burr closer to the outer burr, fining the grind; turning the dial counterclockwise does the opposite, coarsening the grind. A detent under the wheel can settle into any of the 12 grooves, which are the steps. The manual includes fairly accurate recommendations for grind settings: 6-12 clicks from zero for fine, 15-24 for pour over, and 24 and up for coarse methods.

Highlights:
  • Collapsible crank arm paired with removable pommel greatly reduces overall diameter.
  • Diamond pattern facilitates grip.
  • Available with espresso or brewing burrs.
Drawbacks:
  • Fairly small (15g) hopper.
  • Aluminum frame will scratch if mishandled.
  • Stepped adjustment makes dialing in for espresso difficult.

Timemore Chestnut Slim — $139

The NANO and the Slim have a similar slate gray unibody frame, diamond pattern for grip and looks, compact diameter, and 38mm burrs. The Slim is the choice, though, if saving an extra 50mm of space in a suitcase is not a priority but hopper capacity is.

Slim white background
Slim side view with titanium burr

Fit and Finish

The Slim, like the NANO, has a unibody aluminum alloy construction, diamond pattern, dual bearings, black walnut pommel, and compact diameter. They look like family. The Slim, however, stands about 2 inches taller and has a different crank arm, one that cannot be folded down to decrease the overall diameter. The main difference, outside of size, is in the burrs. The NANO comes with a choice but the Slim comes standard with the 38mm titanium-coated stainless steel burrs, which work best grinding for espresso, moka pot, and other methods that necessitate a relatively fine grind.

Grind Adjustment

Timemore uses the same stepped grind adjustment system—similar to the Comandante’s—for all of its grinders. Turning the dial clockwise pushes the center burr closer to the outer burr, fining the grind; turning the dial counterclockwise does the opposite, coarsening the grind. A detent under the wheel settles into the 12 grooves, which are the steps and which serve as reference points for finding and repeating your favorite grind sizes. The Slim’s titanium-coated stainless steel burrs were engineered for grinding on the fine side of the spectrum, a fact that is somewhat counteracted by the stepped adjustment system, making it difficult but not impossible to dial in for espresso. The key is to adjust the puck dose to compensate for the lack of micro adjustments.

Highlights:
  • Compact frame but relatively large (25g) hopper.
  • Diamond pattern facilitates grip.
  • Fits inside the plunger of an AeroPress.
Drawbacks:
  • The titanium-coated stainless steel burrs work best at finer settings.
  • Stepped adjustment system makes dialing in for espresso difficult.
  • The magnetic pommel at times comes off when grinding at high RPM.

Timemore Chestnut G1 — $159-179

At first glance, the G1 does not fit into the Timemore manual grinder lineup. The other models have an industrial-chic look with textured aluminum or minimalist cylindrical bodies. The G1, on the other hand, is a delightful stew of competing identities: natural and manmade, cylinder and box, grinder and art object.

G1 white background
G1 with all parts white background

Fit and Finish

Juxtaposition—of materials, shape, and even use—played a large part in modernism from which Timemore pulled for the G1 design. The frame is a thick, dark gray aluminum unibody construction with matching crank arm, and inside are a wider axle and bearings than are found on the other Timemore models. The midsection is flanked by black walnut—in the removable pommel at the top and push-fit grinds-catch at the bottom. Like the NANO, the G1 comes with a choice of 38mm burrs—stainless steel for brewing or titanium-coated stainless steel for espresso, moka pot, and other methods necessitating a fine grind.

Grind Adjustment

The exterior may be squared off but the burr compartment is cylindrical. As such, the G1 grind adjustment is the same stepped wheel and detent scheme found in the other Timemore models. Turning the dial clockwise pushes the center burr closer to the outer burr, fining the grind; turning the dial counterclockwise does the opposite, coarsening the grind. A detent under the wheel settles into the 12 grooves, which are the steps and which serve as reference points for finding and repeating your favorite grind sizes.

Highlights:
  • Beautiful modern design.
  • Available with espresso or brewing burrs.
  • Premium materials.
Drawbacks:
  • The grinds-catch is difficult to detach smoothly from the body.
  • Stepped adjustment system makes dialing in for espresso (with the titanium-coated burrs) difficult.
  • The body, because of its width and shape, is not as comfortable to hold as other Timemore models.

Comandante C40 MKIII — $250

The Comandante Mk.III hails from Germany, where some of the best equipment used in specialty coffee shops is made. So, understandably, the expectations for this grinder were high. Although it’s rumored some of the first production models had performance issues, the latest grinders are panel built and offer excellent grind quality. In fact, this is a standout, balanced hand grinder that we recommend as your best all around option. At its core the Comandante is a stylish, versatile grinder that is a pleasure to use.

Comandante hand grinder
Comandante hand grinder adjustment

Fit and Finish

The Comandante sports a stainless steel body wrapped in a thin wood veneer treated with a natural wax oil, high-nitrogen martensitic steel burrs (which are highly resistant to pitting), an oak wood handle sourced from the Black Forest, stainless steel bearings, crank and axle, a BPA-free internal plastic frame, a glass grounds container, and a plastic lid attached to the end of the handle. The Comandante has a diameter of about 2.4", a height of 6.3", and a weight of 1.63 lbs. Its hopper and grounds container can hold about 40-45 g of coffee.

Grind Adjustment

The Comandante is one of the few premium hand grinders with stepped grind adjustment. A plastic knob on the underside of the unit controls grind size in ‘clicks’. Part of the benefit of stepped grinding is that it allows the user to replicate the exact same setting over and over. By zeroing out the burrs then counting clicks, specific settings can be referenced.

Highlights:
  • High uniformity across the full range of grind sizes.
  • Premium materials such as the wood veneer and glass grinds-catch.
  • Stepped micro-adjustment system is sufficient for small changes to espresso.
Drawbacks:
  • Consists of many plastic parts.
  • Slightly louder grinding volume than other grinders on this list.
  • Some grind retention around the adjustment wheel.

Orphan Espresso Fixie — $185

The Fixie is Orphan Espresso’s smallest grinder, standing roughly five inches shorter and one inch slimmer than grinders in the company’s Lido line, and lighter by more than a pound, cementing it as the most travel-friendly model from OE and from any manufacturer on this list. Backpackers rejoice!

Fixie white background
Fixie parts white background

Fit and Finish

Designed to be compact and ultralight, i.e. super travel-friendly, the Fixie is just six and a half inches tall and 330 grams, making it lighter and smaller than most coffee bags. The Fixie also looks featherweight. The body and handle are carbon fiber and the grinds-catch is titanium, lending it an aesthetic not unlike the frame on a competition bicycle cresting the Pyrenees. On the inside are an aluminum axle and burr carrier, Delrin bearings, and—the heaviest part by far—a 140g, 47mm stainless steel conical burr set from Etzinger.

Grind Adjustment

The Fixie eschews the common wheel and dial in favor of a “fixed” grind adjustment system wherein spacers are placed on the axle to decrease the distance between the burrs. The grinder comes with three plastic “Fixie Disks” for general grind sizes (fine, medium, and coarse) and four Teflon “Tuner Shims” for minor adjustments. Adding the fine disk makes the grind fine (e.g. Aeropress); adding the medium disk makes the grind medium (e.g. Kalita Wave); and adding the coarse disk makes the grind coarse. Then the grind can be fine-tuned with the shims, which come in two sizes: .10mm and .20 mm.

Highlights:
  • Lightest grinder on this list.
  • Unique grind adjustment system.
  • Comes with Tyvek travel bag.
Drawbacks:
  • The adjustment system has a steep learning curve.
  • Side-fill hopper opening is narrow.
  • Weight has been privileged over grind quality.

Orphan Espresso Lido 3 — $185.00

Possibly the most known of all premium hand grinders, the Lido was one of the first to gain the attention of the specialty coffee community. Over time, Orphan Espresso developed a few iterations, evolving the Lido 1 from a very basic looking tool into the highly refined Lido 3.

Lido 3 hand grinder
Lido 3 hand grinder adjustment wheel

Fit and Finish

The Lido 3 is made of aluminum, stainless steel, silicone, and BPA-free plastics. Unlike previous versions of the Lido, the Lido 3 is made to be very lightweight relative to its size. The slim AeroPress-like hopper, made of a BPA-free medical grade plastic, is easy to hold for long periods of time and is semi transparent, allowing you to see the beans as they fall into the burrs. The grounds container, made of RTP PermaStat ABS plastic, is a highly durable static-resistant BPA-free plastic engineered to be tough, lightweight, and to keep grounds from sticking to the inside. The Lido 3 is the biggest of the hand grinders, at 13.5" in height, about 3" in diameter at the base, and 2" in diameter at the hopper. It weighs about 2.4 lbs., making it the heaviest hand grinder as panel.

Grind Adjustment

The Lido features a stepless grind adjustment with dual threaded rings. Loosen the top ring, then twist the bottom ring to select a grind size. Tighten the top ring back down to lock in your setting. Two blue lines serve as reference points for recalling settings. The top line, painted on the body of the grinder, remains stationary. The bottom blue line on the bottom grind adjustment ring indicates the distance from the stationary line.

The E-T, which are iterations geared towards espresso grinding, feature a finer thread pitch in the adjustment ring. A lateral inch of movement of the Lido 3’s adjustment ring will produce a more substantial change in grind size than the same movement of the E-T’s adjustment ring. This makes it easier to dial in the grinder for espresso, where tiny changes are sometimes necessary.

Highlights:
  • Features a folding handle and includes a neoprene carrying case.
  • Grinds for any brew method.
  • Highest capacity grinds-catch of the hand grinders we carry.
Drawbacks:
  • The adjustment system has a steep learning curve.
  • Relatively short handle and tall body.
  • Needs to be stabilized when grinding.

Orphan Espresso Apex — $485

Perhaps it is unfair to include the Apex in a hand grinder comparison when it was designed to be bolted to a countertop or screwed into a cutting board, but we didn’t know where else to put it and it deserves to be considered alongside other manual grinders, so here it is. The Apex features enormous nesting flat burrs of slightly different diameters (the rotating burr is 78mm while the stationary burr is 75mm) that produce the most uniform grinds we have ever seen from a manual grinder. Intrigued?

Apex white background
Apex rear review white background

Fit and Finish

The Apex is hailed by Orphan as the world’s first and only flat burr manual grinder, which is only half of the story. The other half is in the kind of burrs: stainless steel, deep-cut prism-tooth burrs, commonly referred to as “ghost tooth” burrs, which make this grinder rarer still. Operated at the suggested RPM, which is made easy by the planetary gear drive that delivers four burr spins for every one handle spin, the Apex produces a clean, uniform grind. In addition, the rotational burr is bi-directional, meaning the handle can be turned clockwise or counterclockwise depending on your preference. The Apex is large, though, covering 13 inches from back to front and 5 inches wide at the base, and is relatively heavy (11.13 lbs.), too, because of its hardy materials: a zinc body and base, aluminum chassis, stainless steel axle, and five bearing sets (yes, five!).

Grind Adjustment

The Apex is made for all coffee brewing methods coarser than espresso and Turkish. The grind is easily adjusted by turning a knob on the collar to any of the 20 predetermined stops, which are roughly .075mm from one another. Pretty simple. Orphan Espresso recommends a maximum of 120 handle rotations per minute, which translates to 480RPM on the rotational burr, and which is easier to achieve on the coarser grinds. Go any faster and the grind quality diminishes.

Highlights:
  • Exceptionally uniform grinds.
  • Bi-directional (clockwise or counterclockwise cranking).
  • Relatively large capacity (60 gram) hopper.
Drawbacks:
  • The ghost tooth burrs grind more slowly than conical or standard flat burrs.
  • Must be secured to table or base.
  • A few stubborn beans may get caught in the impeller and fail to feed into the burrs.

Option-O REMI — $239

A few years ago a manual grinder called the Helor 101 made quite an impression. It looked cool. It worked well. And it came with not one but two burr sets—one for espresso and one for filter. But then it disappeared. Lucky for us, Option-O has resurrected the Helor 101 in a new package called the REMI.

REMI white background
REMI adjustment wheel close up white background

Fit and Finish

The REMI, like the Helor 101 from which it comes, sports a sleek Silicon Valley exterior—a matte silver aluminum body and grinds-catch, a slate-gray silicone grip, and a beechwood-tipped ergonomic crank arm. On the inside, the REMI strays a bit from its predecessor. The grinds-catch uses an innovative magnetic connection (as opposed to a simple gasket) with nine magnetic connections on the bottom of the body and top of the catch; and the interior frame has two struts (not three, as was the case), allowing more room for filling. The 38mm conical steel burrs are capable of grinding for French Press down to some AeroPress, but are not efficient enough to produce espresso powder. Espresso burrs are available as an add-on.

Grind Adjustment

With the REMI, Option-O did not reinvent the wheel. In fact, its stepless grind adjustment wheel is (nearly) identical to those used in many other grinds on this list (and the Helor 101), including the Comandante and every model in Timemore’s offerings. The grind size is changed by turning a wheel clockwise for finer or counterclockwise for coarser. There aren’t any audible clicks, as with the Comandante, for reference, but there are dots along the perimeter to help you find and recall your preferred grind settings. The wheel is perfectly suited for dialing in espresso, but, as said above, the burrs are not. You can, however, purchase the espresso burrs as an extra, unlocking the finer range.

Highlights:
  • Elegant modern aesthetic.
  • Innovative magnetic grinds-catch seal.
  • Smooth stepless grind adjustment.
Drawbacks:
  • Expensive compared to other grinders with similar performance.
  • The aluminum body is very easily scratched.
  • Cannot grind efficiently for espresso (with the standard burrs).

Kinu M47 — $344.99

Constructed primarily of steel parts, the M47 is solid to hold (and noticeably heavy) with little slop or play in the parts. The grinding action is incredibly smooth and its 47 mm conical steel burrs make short work of your bean dose even at espresso-fine settings. Its weight and its open-top design make it less convenient for travel, but overall this is a superb hand grinder.

Feld2 hand grinder
Feld2 hand grinder detail

Fit and Finish

Kinu has clearly put a great deal of thought and care into the design of the M47, and while none of the other grinders in this comparison feel cheap, it does evoke a greater feeling of durability and stability than some. The M47 is primarily made of stainless steel—only the handle pommel and some other trim parts are made of black ABS plastic. Inside is a set of 47 mm “Black Fusion” coated conical steel burrs, four steel bearings, and internal steel supports. The hopper portion can hold 30-40 grams of whole beans on average, though we have been able to squeeze in 50 with certain denser coffees. On the novel side of things, the catch cup uses a set of magnets to attach directly to the ring burr, so it can be removed with a solid tug but stays fixed in place while grinding. The grinder measures 8.25” high, 2.75” deep, and 7.8” wide with the handle attached (the handle easily unscrews for storage, but no holster is provided with the grinder). At 2.3 lbs., it is a heavy grinder compared to others.

Grind Adjustment

Grind adjustment is micro-stepped: each click on the adjustment wheel corresponds to 0.01mm of burr travel, which is more than suitable for dialing in espresso. The adjustment wheel is clearly marked with numbers and dashes, each registering a click thanks to the detents, and there are 50 clicks per revolution. The top screw must be loosened slightly for easier grind adjustment, but otherwise it is simple and clear to make adjustments and record your desired settings to return to later.

Highlights:
  • Exceptional build quality and smooth grind.
  • Generous manufacturer warranty (5 years).
  • Fast, simple grind adjustment with actual reference for burr distance (0.01 mm per click)
Drawbacks:
  • Coarse grind settings yield more fines than comparable grinders.
  • Depending on grip preference, the ABS thumb stopper may be uncomfortable.
  • The magnets in the grinds-catch have been known to come loose or dislodge.

Kinu M47 Simplicity — $269

The M47 Simplicity is exactly what its name suggests: a simpler version of the M47. Simple here does not refer to the grinder’s capability. In fact, the Simplicity uses the same premium stainless steel body and internals as the original M47 Classic, replacing some of the less important parts with plastic to cut costs and weight, so operation is practically identical.

Kinu Simplicity white background
Kinu Simplicity on side with white background

Fit and Finish

The whirring is gone and so is some of the steel, but mostly the Simplicity looks and feels like the M47 Classic. The differences here are mostly cosmetic. The bean funnel and grinds-catch are ABS plastic, and the pommel is completely plastic, too, doing away with the original’s silver accent. Those changes reduce the height by a fraction and the weight by about 200 grams (to 2.1 lbs.). Much is the same, though, including the thumb stopper and all the important internals: 47mm “Black Fusion” coated conical steel burrs (best suited for espresso), stainless steel axle, roller bearings, and thick steel supports. The hopper can hold 30-40 grams of whole beans, but—as with the other M47s—lacks a lid, so err on the side of a controlled grinding motion.

Grind Adjustment

Grind adjustment is the same, too—loosen the top nut, adjust the grind, and then tighten the top nut to lock. Technically, the Classic has 50 clicks per revolution, and is therefore called “micro-stepped”; however, the steps are so incredibly tiny and the clicks so incredibly faint that it hardly earns the distinction. In the Simplicity, simplicity won out and the clicks were removed in favor of a completely stepless (read: clickless) adjustment scheme, making it similarly espresso-friendly. The adjustment wheel is identical to the other M47s, too, with numerals (0-9) and dashes (4 between each number) for reference, and the grind is likewise changed by unscrewing the top nut before turning the wheel to a desired grind size.

Highlights:
  • Exceptional build quality and smooth grind.
  • Generous manufacturer warranty (5 years).
  • Fast, simple grind adjustment with actual reference for burr distance (0.01 mm per click)
Drawbacks:
  • Coarse grind settings yield more fines than comparable grinders.
  • Depending on grip preference, the ABS thumb stopper may be uncomfortable.
  • More plastic parts than the original M47.

Kinu M47 Phoenix — $199

In 2018, Kinu’s factory in Reghin, Romania caught fire. The water from the firefight, when paired with the flames and smoke—not to mention the cold winter!—, thoroughly destroyed the building. This grinder, the Phoenix, was the first grinder produced by Kinu after the disaster, and was made with much more plastic than its predecessors to speed along the production timeline, filling that Kinu-size gap in the market created by the fire.

Kinu Phoenix white background
Phoenix on side with white background

Fit and Finish

The Phoenix is the outlier in the M47 lineup because the internal supports, which in the other models are thick steel bars that auto-center the burrs, are plastic pieces meant only to hold the axle in place at the top and bottom of the body. The result is a significantly lighter grinder (1.6 lb.) that doesn’t compromise much, if any, in grind quality. Because the thick steel supports have been removed, the hopper is much roomier and can hold up to 60 grams of beans. The lidlessness, though, presents the same problem as with the other M47s at the higher capacities, so err on the side of caution. The interior shares the ABS plastic grinds-catch with the Simplicity and other key parts—stainless steel body and axle, 47mm conical burrs, and ball bearings—with all M47 models.

Grind Adjustment

Grind adjustment on the Phoenix is the same as on the Simplicity. The adjustment wheel is clearly marked with numbers and dashes, amounting to 50 options per revolution.

Highlights:
  • Depending on your grip preference, the silicone ring may be more comfortable than the thumb stop on the other Kinu models.
  • Generous manufacturer warranty (5 years).
  • Fast, simple grind adjustment.
Drawbacks:
  • Many more plastic parts, including internal supports, than original M47.
  • Coarse grind settings yield more fines than comparable grinders.
  • Plastic grinds-catch is harder to maneuver than the original M47's magnetic catch.

Knock Aergrind — $159.99

The Aergrind may just be the ultimate grinder for the frugal traveler. Designed to fit inside an AeroPress plunger, the Aergrind is the smallest grinder in our lineup and makes for the perfect addition to your hiking or camping gear, or even a home brewing setup. Beyond being designed with the AeroPress in mind, it also performs best when grinding for that or similar hybrid brewing methods such as the Delter Press. If that is your favorite way to brew, then this economical grinder offers similar grind quality to other premium models for a fraction of the price.

Aergrind hand grinder
Aergrind hand grinder detail

Fit and Finish

The Aergrind features a 38mm ceramic-coated steel burr set, familiar to those who’ve used the Feldgrind or Feld2. The Aergrind stands only 14.5cm high and has a diameter of 4.7cm. A simple removable steel handle with a plastic knob fits over the center shaft against a thin black plastic lid. The Aergrind also features dual bearing mounts and an anodized unibody milled from aluminum. Like Knock’s other grinders, the diameter of the Aergrind feels perfect for the hand and grinding is smooth.

Grind Adjustment

Like Knock’s other models, stepless adjustments to grind size are made at the top of the grinder. Hold the lid in place and rotate the handle to adjust grind size. A numerical reference from 1-12 is imprinted on the top of lid. Each number has two dots between them, for total of 36 reference points. A small notch near the base of the handle serves as an indicator for the current setting. Because the Aergrind requires no disassembly when adjusting grind size, changes can be made faster than you can say, “Made By Knock”.

Highlights:
  • Fits inside the chamber of the AeroPress plunger.
  • Similar grind quality to the Feld2 at a lower price.
  • Super fast grind adjustment.
Drawbacks:
  • The handle and rubber sleeve do not fit inside an AeroPress with the grinder.
  • Center burr has a very small amount of lateral play.
  • Fines can be an issue for pour over brewing methods, limiting it flexibility as an all purpose hand grinder.

In conclusion:

From size to style, price and application—there are several things to consider when buying a hand grinder. Our approach here at Prima is to curate a condensed selection of equipment through first-hand experience and judgement of quality, value, and features, then present the best to you. Although each of these grinders produces largely similar uniformity of grind (so similar we didn’t feel it was worth comparing), there are plenty of distinguishing features. There’s a grinder for everyone, and we hope this comparison guide was useful in choosing a hand grinder most relevant to your brewing needs.


Last Updated: January 2020
Dec 18th 2020 Ryan Felbinger & Steve Morrow

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